benedictine

Earhart

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I feel like I haven’t posted in ages and for that, I am sorry […commits seppuku]

This is definitely one of my favorite OG cocktails. Hubris? What is that? I like it mostly because it had some actual thought put into it. As you may know, good cocktails have this nice even flow to them; You add a bit of this, you had an idea to add a bit of that or you simply fucked up and added the wrong thing while watching some squirrels run around outside. Well. That’s been my experience at least. But I’m also a guy that sometimes cant recall if I put deodorant on after taking a shower, so I spend the rest of the day paranoid, trying not to sweat.

This drink was for the Aviation American Gin facebook contest that I’ve been participating in for the last 6 weeks. The contest is still going on and there have been some truly fantastic entries. Best of luck to al…..screw that…I hope I (me) win that trip to the House Spirits distillery in Portland, OR [insert maniacal laugh here]. As you perhaps know by the name, this Aviation gin inspired cocktail was an ode to Amelia Earhart. Wiki her or watch that movie, she was a total badass. The American gin signifies her, the Jameson whiskey for where she first landed and the Benedictine and Dolin Blanc for her (missed) targeted LZ. Surprisingly, this works incredibly well and makes for a great drink to sip.

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Aviation gin
Blanc vermouth
Benedictine
Irish whiskey
Bitters

If you dont have Abbott’s bitters (I’m using the stuff made by Bob’s in England), it’ll still be tasty but it’ll be missing something. I’ve made this with cherry, fig, lavender and angostura bitters and it’s been quite nice. Go crazy. Just try and stay away from the more citrus-y bitters as they throw it off quite a bit.

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My wife put it this way when she took a sip:
“it’s like a female version of a negroni”
…I’ll take that. I would have also been happy with:
“it’s like the 90’s era Michael Jackson”.

1 3/4 oz dry gin  [ Aviation American Gin ]
1 oz blanc vermouth  [ Dolin ]
1/2 oz irish whiskey  [ Jameson ]
1/4 oz Benedictine
2 dashes of Abbott’s bitters  [ Bob’s ]

Get that mixing glass out and stir.
Strain into a rocks glass with a nice chunk of ice.

[ Enjoy ]

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Red Queen

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I’m a sucker for all things Alice in Wonderland…

So this drink was meant to go in last week’s regularly scheduled programming buuuuut I was trying to prove to myself (and my dad) that I can build shit. Like for REAL build things, not just a 5 piece table from Ikea. Well kids, turns out I cant. I was trying to build a set of soft boxes for lighting and I’m pretty sure that starting off by using an old wet box from Crate & Barrel as the base for it was ill advised (in retrospect). I’ll keep trying (doubtful) but given that I have the attention span of a chipmunk (I don’t even know what that means), I’m all but certain I’ll be day drinking to accommodate my photography for
the time being.

This week’s drink is all booze. Now before you get all excited, it’s not very strong -insert sad trombone here-. Made it a couple weeks back when mixing a drink called ‘Elixir No.1′ from The American Cocktail by the folks from Imbibe magazine. I’m sure that drink would have been great (?) but since I didn’t have all the ingredients for it, I started to throw some random shit in there until I ended up with a mutated (but highly “drinkable”) version that I liked a lot. So who likes “drinks that don’t make you immediately have to calculate how many sips of them you can have before getting sloppy”?! I DO.

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B&B
Campari
Dry Vermouth
Velvet Falernum
Bitters

I bought a bottle of B&B thinking it was the same as regular ‘ol Benedictine and boy was I wrong. So I’ve been trying to find new and exciting ways to use this stuff. This being one of them. If you have the OG Benedictine, I’d advise against the Falernum  [amp it up to 1 oz each] since that stuff is pretty sweet too.

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3/4 oz B&B  [ Benedictine & Brandy ]
3/4 oz Dry Vermouth  [ Dolin Dry ]
3/4 oz Campari  [ er…Campari ]
3/4 oz Velvet Falernum  [ John D. Taylor’s ]
Dash of Peychaud’s
10 drops of Abbot’s  [ Bob’s ]

Stir them in your favorite glass candle holder that you use as a mixing glass when nobody’s watching.
Strain into a chilled martini glass.
Take an orange peel and press the oils over the drink, then discard it [let it go. It’s OK]
Garnish with some cherries.

[ Enjoy ]

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Black Flag

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-Insert clever Henry Rollins joke here-

I infused Cognac because I don’t care much for it. In fact, I infused about 1/2 a bottle of Courvoisier that I got for Christmas yet had never really used other than to show people that French is not only difficult to pronounce but even harder to spell. I’m sure I’ll be infusing other spirits soon (looking @ you, bottle of Knob Creek bourbon) based on this experiment. Vanilla beans. Herbs. Buffalo chicken wings. You name it; I’ll be on it.

I didn’t infuse an entire bottle because I wasn’t sure what the result would be, nor if I would want 750 ml of black tea infused cognac (which came out pretty great), so I only infused about 10 oz of it. Will I be making more? Definitely. But I think I’ll use a different brand of cognac next time or may just switch to Brandy altogether. The name comes from the black tea and the black mission fig bitters from Brooklyn Bitters . I was originally going to call it “Fuck, I have absolutely no idea what I’m doing here and this drink is strong. Oh god its so strong” but opted against it at the last minute. Maybe next time?

So here’s a booze-only drink (one of many to follow) for those that like a good cocktail with depth and variety.

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Tea infused Cognac
Benedictine
Fernet Branca
Dry vermouth
Bitters
Demerara simple

I used Dolin Dry here (after testing Lillet Blanc and Martini dry) and felt that it worked much better than sweet vermouth (Dolin Rouge) which would make it more Vieux Carre in nature and a bit sweeter.

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1 1/2 oz Bavarian Berry black tea infused Courvoisier cognac*
3/4 oz Benedictine
3/4 oz Dolin Dry vermouth
1/2 oz Fernet Branca
10 drops Brooklyn Hemispherical Black Mission Fig bitters
Couple dashes of demerara simple

*To infuse the cognac: take a single serving of your favorite black tea (I used Bavarian Berry Black, which is nice and bright with little hints of fruit) and steep it in a separate glass bottle with about 8 oz of cognac (or technically any spirit) for about 12-24 hours. Fine strain it into yet another bottle to remove any and all leaves and sediment. That’s it really. Keep it in the fridge and it’ll last for about a week. 

Pour everything in a mixing glass. Even the dashes of syrup.
Stir it nicely. In fact, let this be the therapeutic part of the process. Yeah.
Strain into a sandwich bag. Just kidding. A coupe.
Cut a fresh lemon peel and squeeze the oils in and around the glass. Discard when done.

[Enjoy]

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