blood

Blood & Thunder

[vc_separator width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”] [vc_column width=”2/3″ el_position=”first”] [vc_column_text width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]

The original calls for blended Scotch, which is curb-stomped here by my old pal, tequila, a spirit that not only sounds more menacing in its almost automatic drunken-flashback inducing montage but also makes it more appealing to a wider spectrum of people (IMO)… Unless you’re using Jose Cuervo, in which case just stop reading this right now and come back when I have a slushy margarita recipe. No! Come back! Lets just pretend you’re not using that shit and we can still be friends (the kind of friends that only communicate via Facebook likes).

I’ve gone ahead and taken what Cale Green from ‘Tavern Law, Need & Thread’ (Seattle) devised and changed it to what [to me] makes more sense, both for the cocktail itself but for the name: Blood oranges. Yup. Those weird little oranges that only come out (here in the North East at least) around this time of year but that are not only pretty to look at [I mean seriously, these things make all other citrus their bitch] but have a wonderful flavor that goes perfect in cocktails (see here ). Only this guy wouldn’t like them.

 

[/vc_column_text] [vc_text_separator title=”crafting:” title_align=”separator_align_left” width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”] [/vc_column] [vc_column width=”1/3″ el_position=”last”] [vc_column_text width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]

Blanco Tequila
Cheery Heering
Sweet Vermouth
Blood Orange

To be honest, I gave this drink a try mainly because I’m a big Mastodon fan. Having never tried a ‘Blood and Sand’ (sorry but the idea of those ingredients didn’t really do it for me) I was more interested in a variation of the original with ingredients that seemed much more appealing.

 

[/vc_column_text] [/vc_column] [vc_column width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”] [vc_column_text width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]

Super easy. Equal parts:
El Tesoro Platinum Tequila
Cherry Heering
Dolin Rouge
Fresh Blood Orange Juice
4 drops of (Bob’s) Abbot’s bitters (optional)

Shake it to wake it up.

For the garnish:
Thin slice of blood orange + maraschino cherry.
[Enjoy]

[/vc_column_text] [/vc_column]

La Cubanita

[vc_separator width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”] [vc_column width=”2/3″ el_position=”first”] [vc_column_text width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]

I intended to name this post “The eternal struggle for Bank’s 5 Island Rum” but it doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue. So instead I made a drink inspired by the infuriatingly-hard-to-find rum (in the NorthEast at least) which I finally got a couple weeks ago after a +month long search, along with my own variation on the daiquiri.

The funny part is that I’m not the biggest fan of rum; I enjoy a refreshing mojito just as much as the next guy, trust me, but most of the pretentious cocktails I enjoy are old ones that don’t call for rum. You know who loves drinks with rum tho?! Women… and pirates. I know that may sound a bit sexist but try and think of as many cocktails with rum as you can….now tell me who you pictured drinking them? If you answered my sister (sorry, Flor) then you are correct.

So this one’s for them; For the ladies [but the fellas’ can enjoy it just as well].

[/vc_column_text] [vc_text_separator title=”crafting:” title_align=”separator_align_left” width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”] [/vc_column] [vc_column width=”1/3″ el_position=”last”] [vc_column_text width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]

Bank’s 5 Island Rum
Velvet Falernum
Lime juice
Blood orange juice
Grenadine

Finding a bottle of this rum will probably be my highest achievement for 2012. What can I say, I aim low.

[/vc_column_text] [/vc_column] [vc_column width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”] [vc_column_text width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]

2 parts Bank’s 5 Island Rum
1/2 part Lime juice
3/4 part Blood orange juice
1/2 part velvet falernum
1 barspoon of Grenadine [NOT that cheap shit puh-lease]

Pour into a shaker, add ice and beat the devil out of it.
Double strain into a chilled glass.
Garnish with a blood orange wheel or a lime wheel.
[Enjoy]

[/vc_column_text] [/vc_column]