classic

Lion’s Tail

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If you’ve never been to Drink [in the now frozen tundra that is Boston], the place consists of connected bars where they tailor cocktails based on your preference and suggest different drinks in accordance to it. That’s probably an accurate, yet oversimplification of this place but if you know what you like or want to try new things, this is definitely the place.

Some of our libations from that evening:

a vodka Monkey Gland.
a Pegu Club style gin-gin mule(?) Warning: drinking this was like tasting chocolate for the first time.
Dead Man’s Mule (shutTheFrontDoor was this good)
Chartreuse tasting [I now know the difference between the 2, you guys!]
Allspice Dram sampling [This is what lead to the conversation on the Lion’s Tail]

…basically anything with their in-house ginger beer could not go into my mouth fast enough.

This cocktail, though not my “favorite of all time!” is special because it was given to me as a birthday gift. Not the drink itself, but the knowledge of it, in the form of a hand written recipe [taken from some old looking book from the back of the bar], along with a tiny bottle of St. Elizabeth Allspice Dram wrapped in tape with the words “happy birthday”. It was a night of first (I’ve never been 31 until that day. I think Im doing fine with this age. I could do without the peeing blood part but that’s normal, right?), I’d never been to Drink and I had never met such a bad-ass working the stick as Estrellita, our bartender for the evening.

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Bourbon whiskey
Allspice Dram
Lime juice
Demerara syrup*
Angostura

*I first tested this out with regular simple syrup (1/1) before making some Demerara syrup and I gotta say, it really is better with the Demerara, as it gives it a subtle difference in the sweetness along with reinforcing the rich color of this drink.

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The real point of focus here, where your drink will really excel is the Bourbon, as the cocktail itself can be slightly on the sweet side in itself, you’d want to stay away from sweeter tasting bourbons (Maker’s Mark for example. Though that is still my favorite for a whiskey sour) and just the same, you don’t want to kill it with something that’s gonna kick its ass (I’m looking at you 101 wild turkey).

1 3/4 part Wild Turkey 81 bourbon
1/4 part St Elizabeth allspice dram
1/2 part lime juice
1/2 part demerara syrup
2 dashes of Angostura bitters

shake it like it owes you money.
double strain into a martini/coupe glass and garnish with a lime wheel.
[Enjoy]

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Blood & Thunder

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The original calls for blended Scotch, which is curb-stomped here by my old pal, tequila, a spirit that not only sounds more menacing in its almost automatic drunken-flashback inducing montage but also makes it more appealing to a wider spectrum of people (IMO)… Unless you’re using Jose Cuervo, in which case just stop reading this right now and come back when I have a slushy margarita recipe. No! Come back! Lets just pretend you’re not using that shit and we can still be friends (the kind of friends that only communicate via Facebook likes).

I’ve gone ahead and taken what Cale Green from ‘Tavern Law, Need & Thread’ (Seattle) devised and changed it to what [to me] makes more sense, both for the cocktail itself but for the name: Blood oranges. Yup. Those weird little oranges that only come out (here in the North East at least) around this time of year but that are not only pretty to look at [I mean seriously, these things make all other citrus their bitch] but have a wonderful flavor that goes perfect in cocktails (see here ). Only this guy wouldn’t like them.

 

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Blanco Tequila
Cheery Heering
Sweet Vermouth
Blood Orange

To be honest, I gave this drink a try mainly because I’m a big Mastodon fan. Having never tried a ‘Blood and Sand’ (sorry but the idea of those ingredients didn’t really do it for me) I was more interested in a variation of the original with ingredients that seemed much more appealing.

 

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Super easy. Equal parts:
El Tesoro Platinum Tequila
Cherry Heering
Dolin Rouge
Fresh Blood Orange Juice
4 drops of (Bob’s) Abbot’s bitters (optional)

Shake it to wake it up.

For the garnish:
Thin slice of blood orange + maraschino cherry.
[Enjoy]

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Moscow Mule

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Enter the dragon mule. This cocktail is best kicked back (see what I did there?! …you know… cause mules ki… ANYWAYS) in a frosted copper mug (it doesn’t have to but man does it make it recognizable) while imbibing with friends. Or alone, if that’s your thing but really, don’t be that guy.
i prefer to use Russian vodka in my mules, simply because it makes it feel authentic. Though this cocktail wasn’t invented in Russia, it would feel weird to drink it with vodka from another country. Kinda like kissing your cousin. Unless thats your thing, but for fuck sake, really try not to be that guy.
Its crazy simple, is open to so many variations and its fun ’cause you get to build it in the copper mug itself.

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Vodka
Lime juice
Ginger beer

I use Stoli Gold vodka in my mules but it is very common to see ‘Russian Standard’ used, which in a drink like this, is more than serviceable.

As for the ginger beer, this is really the key ingredient in a great mule, so the better the beer, the better the taste. I’ve used Maine Root ginger beer here.

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Build your mules within the copper mugs. There’s no shame in doing it all in the shaker and then topping off your mug with the ginger beer but I’m pretty sure that your street cred (the one you’ve been working on so hard over the last 15 minutes) will be all but erased. Your call, tough guy.

4 parts Stoli Gold Vodka
1 part lime juice
Fever-Tree Ginger Beer

Take your sweet-ass copper mug and fill it about 1/2 way with crushed ice.
add the 4 parts of vodka and the freshly (oh so fresh and so clean) squeezed lime juice.
Add some of that ginger beer that has been waiting for its turn, but leave some room.
Stir it a bit with your barspoon [not nearly as much as you would a martini]
Add a bit more crushed ice to make it look pretty and keep it chilled.
Garnish with a lime wedge or wheel [some folks add a cucumber spear but I don’t get that]
[Enjoy]

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