lemongrass

Hey That’s My Bike

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So…Easter happened. Yeah. That was fun? It’s a weird holiday; Especially if you don’t have kids and aren’t (“and arent?” what fucking language is this blog in?) religious (unless you count religiously day drinking on Easter Sunday). So for me it was making brunch-y egg drinks for my fiance and me while hearing our neighbor’s kids scream their lungs out looking for Easter eggs while high on chocolate bunnies and Cadbury eggs.

Fun fact: When I was a kid, the only egg hunts I was involved in during Easter involved hard boiled eggs EXCLUSIVELY. After finding these motherf*ckers, I was then expected to eat them. So many eggs. So many. WHY WAS I SO GOOD AT FINDING THEM?! Back to the booze…

This drink is a mix between a pisco sour and a Ramos gin fizz. I don’t have it in me to ever add cream into a cocktail, as delicious as it may sound, so instead I’ll add any other random shit I can throw at it. I reused some of my leftover lemongrass / palm sugar syrup which was really nice here but it probably tastes the same with regular simple to be fair. Just be warned, we were surprised at how easy we were downing these. Way past brunch. Unless brunch is still going on @ around 10pm…

 

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Gin
Lillet Blanc
Bitters
Lime juice
Cucumber juice
Simple syrup
Egg white

In this case, I used Bitterman’s Boston Bittahs because the chamomile and citrus in it compliments the rest of the flavors, but I’m certain a 1 to 1 of orange and angostura bitters would work nice too.

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2 parts Hendrick’s gin
1/2 part Lillet Blanc
1/2 part blended/muddled cucumber juice
1/2 part lime juice
1/2 part lemongrass / palm sugar syrup (remnants from last week’s post)
2 eye droppers of Bitterman’s Boston Bittahs
1 egg white

Add the gin, lillet, bitters, juices and syrup to one part of your shaker.
Crack the egg and pour the egg white in the other half, so that you can clear out any shell if needed or in case you were to dump the yolk.
Pour one into the other and give it a dry shake for about 15-20 seconds (What’s a dry shake? It’s the best way to homogenize that egg and start getting that aerated, silky texture that you’re gonna want. All without diluting with water).
Pop the seal, add your ice and go to town on it again as usual.

strain into a coupe or rocks glass*.
*Honestly I did this drink a few times on Easter and I poured it into a different type of glass each time. So just do whatever feels right to you.

No need to double strain here. You’d be robbing yourself of that frothy egg mixture.
Garnish with a dehydrated lime wheel and some thin slices of English cucumber.
[ Enjoy ]

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Heart of Darkness

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Don’t try and use lemongrass as a straw. It just doesn’t work and you end up winded as f*ck.

I’m letting you know that this drink is a pain in the ass to make. I shouldn’t say that when the whole point of my site is to provide cocktail recipes that anyone can make but it’s a delicious labor of love for what it’s worth. For that I’d advise that if anyone reading this actually decides to make it, make a lot of it. You’ll find that its remarkably easy to drink and if you enjoy Thai food (I do and I find that remarkably easy to eat. All of it) then this is a drink that’ll have a lot of those familiar flavors and aromas.

Lets get this out of the way: making your own tamarind juice is delicious but it’s kinda gross to work with. You buy this block of seedless pulp (@ basically any Asian market), then you have to warm it up, strain it, dilute it, bottle it. But once you’re done, you have this nice tarty juice that has this subtle acidity to it that’s just begging to be used in cocktails. Because of said acidity/tartness, I didn’t really use much citrus in this drink and if you use more tamarind, you may not even need any at all.  If you already make your own ginger beer, then I highly advise you use it here. Especially if you make it with a lot of that ginger spice (not that one but you know you were into them at some point. Don’t lie to yourself).

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Spiced rum
Tamarind juice
Allspice dram
Angostura bitters
palm sugar / lemongrass  simple*

This drink is a take on the ‘Dark & Stormy’ which is pretty much a rum based Moscow Mule. So to make it more interesting, I added a lot of South East Asian flavors to make it more unique.

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*For the palm sugar / lemongrass simple:
Instead of using regular simple, take 1 part palm sugar (natural sugars from coconut trees) to equal part water; Add to that a couple 4″ pieces of fresh lemongrass  (pro tip: beat them up a bit with a muddler to loosen  up the fibers and release its flavors). Boil. simmer. cool. strain. bottle. You know the drill.

1 3/4 oz Sailor Jerry spiced rum
1/4 oz St. Elizabeth Allspice Dram
2 dashes Angostura bitters
3/4 oz palm sugar / lemongrass simple
3/4 oz tamarind juice
1 wedge of lime (bout an 1/8 of a lime in size)
Shake all of the above and strain into a Collins glass with some fresh ice.
Top up with ginger beer (Fever Tree here).
Garnish with a stick of lemongrass, a lime wheel and a kaffir lime leaf.
[ Enjoy ]

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